Annual glimpse of advents

A quick rundown of this year’s online advent calendar shennanigans:

As usual (for the 15th year) there’s the Bristol-based Watershed’s marvellous array of short films from young people worldwide, at Electric December.

Not quite so excitingly, The Economist are posting one of their most popular 2013 infographics each day – but since infographics has become a interdepartmental buzzword at work, I might cast a half-interested cursory glance.

If you want something rather more spiritual, why not try out Rev Mark’s humble and sincere offering for some more church felt ruminations. And here’s something of interest from Embrace the Middle East, whose remit is “to provide health, education and community development programmes for the most disadvantaged people in the lands of the Bible – regardless of their faith or nationality” – very laudable Christian activity.

But,
Tate the cat‘s not on again this year – Penny Schenk’s delightful, warm-hearted stories featuring a French cheese-maker and his cat. Enjoy an old one instead.
Or take a cosmic breath of fresh space on Hubble 2010.

Or splash out on a whisky calendar!

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3 Responses to Annual glimpse of advents

  1. April Henry says:

    Okay, this is totally unrelated to your post, so feel free to delete, but I was looking at your previous blog which had some Puffin Post covers and talked about Puffin Post. You seem to know a lot about it. For years, I have been trying to figure out something, with no success. (I live in Portland, Oregon, in the US.)

    Years ago I sent a short story about a six-foot-tall frog named Herman who loved peanut butter to Roald Dahl. He sent me back a postcard. It’s dated 24th August ’72, and says, “Dear April, I loved your story about Herman the frog. I read it aloud to my daughter, Ophelia, who also loved it. I read it to my secretary, Hazel, who giggled. Lots of love, Roald Dahl.”

    Somehow I’ve managed to hold onto this postcard for more than 40 years.

    What his postcard didn’t say is that he also shared the story with an editor at the Puffin Post. Could it have been Kaye Webb? She contacted me and asked to publish it. But I don’t even have a copy of the magazine or her letter or anything.

    I wish I lived in England so I could track down a copy! I have occasionally found people on ebay with old issues for sale, but haven’t been able to find the right issue. And who knows, maybe she just asked to publish it and never actually did. My memory of what happened when I was 12 is not that good any more. I’m just lucky I held on to that postcard through all these years. I was starting to think I made the whole thing up when tonight I opened up a book from my childhood and saw a Puffin Post bookplate staring back at me. Bet there’s not a lot of those running around in America.

    I would desperately like to figure out which issue it was and then haunt ebay until I can buy a copy. Do you have access to issues from that time? (I think you had some and your brother did?)

    Fingers crossed,
    April Henry (which is the name the story was published under, too)

    • johnnynorms says:

      Hi April,
      No luck sorry – I do have the Puffin Posts from around that time, but I can’t see your story published in any of them. I don’t have the ’74 Summer and Autumn issues, but presumably it would be in a ’72 or ’73 issue?

      • April Henry says:

        Thanks so much for looking! I’ve even tried 7 Stories but they don’t have all the volumes. It either was published late or not at all. I wish my 40 year old memories were clearer!

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